Séminaire / Conférence
Participants
  • Marco Stroppa (conférencier)
  • Carlo Laurenzi (conférencier)

Marco Stroppa compositeur
Carlo Laurenzi réalisateur en informatique musicale

Re Orso, légende de Arrigo Boito, oeuvre électronique Ircam créé le 19 mai 2012 à l'Opéra Comique, Salle Favart.

Re Orso is the first opera performed in an opera house where the electronics plays such an important dramaturgic role, but where the term "electronics" itself does not appear in the title. This is to highlight its fundamental role: to serve the drama and the stories of the characters.
Several technologies were used for the production of this large electronic part, of which many were developed specifically for this project by Carlo Laurenzi, Jean Bresson, Raphael Foulon and the help of Arshia Cont and his staff. They will be presented in two parts.
Part one is dedicated to the analysis of the role of the robotic piano (a Disklavier, acting as a pseudo-human character on stage), of the talking accordion, of the role of the space and of several other sound sources that were punctually used during the piece (using Audiosculpt, Modalys and OMChroma). Part two (March 4th) will present the major technological developments around chromax with rhythmical feedback and the control and synthesis of imaginary voices with OMChant, which constituted the scientific heart of the production.

Marco Stroppa avec Carlo Laurenzi Re Orso

Marco Stroppa compositeur
Carlo Laurenzi réalisateur en informatique musicale

Re Orso (2012), légende de Arrigo Boito, oeuvre électronique Ircam créé le 19 mai 2012 à l'Opéra Comique, Salle Favart.

Re Orso is the first opera performed in an opera house where the electronics plays such an important dramaturgic role, but where the term "electronics" itself does not appear in the title. This is to highlight its fundamental role: to serve the drama and the stories of the characters.
Several technologies were used for the production of this large electronic part, of which many were developed specifically for this project by Carlo Laurenzi, Jean Bresson, Raphael Foulon and the help of Arshia Cont and his staff. They will be presented in two parts.
Part one is dedicated to the analysis of the role of the robotic piano (a Disklavier, acting as a pseudo-human character on stage), of the talking accordion, of the role of the space and of several other sound sources that were punctually used during the piece (using Audiosculpt, Modalys and OMChroma). Part two (March 4th) will present the major technological developments around chromax with rhythmical feedback and the control and synthesis of imaginary voices with OMChant, which constituted the scientific heart of the production.

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